J MARTIN’S BLOG

March 12, 2008

The real roots

Filed under: Kadazan Dusun, Thoughts — J Martin @ 11:43 pm

Tanak Dusun ka nga amu ih ma koilo do mimboros Dusun.
Tanak Dusun ka nga amu ih ma karati Dusun.
Tanak Dusun ka nga mibooros ih ma Malayu.
Tanak Dusun ka nga mimboros ih ma Nonggiris.
Osonong da do koilo ngai mimboros Dusun, Nonggiris, Malayu om suai ngai …

Nokuro gia molohing tokou tu amu minongubas dati mimboros Dusun di laid?
Nokuro gia molohing tokou tu minongubas dati Malayu kampung di laid?
Nokuro gia tu binarasan yati do ‘Saya saput kau!’ di laid?

These are just few words to show how much our own identity eroded by assimilating others identities. Why in the beginning our mothers and fathers talked to us in ‘alien’ language as if we are not part of the original community?

I think they assumed that by speaking other language to their kids, they helped modernize their kids.

I remember in the past (still now) almost all parents in the neighborhood talked ‘Malayu‘ to their kids. Good if they teach proper Malay, but it’s always campur-campur, mix Dusun with Malay and in the end, almost nobody talking correctly/properly … It’s more obvious to newer generations … I am lucky because my parents didn’t talk Malayu to me at all … My not-so-little-anymore brother now talking in Malayu because my parents used to speak Malayu with him in the past … But sometimes I hear him trying to talk Dusun to his fellow Dusun-based friends …

It’s not that knowing other-than mother-tongue language is bad, it’s just better if we don’t lost our own identity because it’s not good if someone pointed us as aliens among our very own community …

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October 19, 2007

Dictionary, Kadazandusun – Bahasa Melayu – English

Filed under: Kadazan Dusun — J Martin @ 11:13 pm

In case anybody wanted to learn a word or two about Kadazandusun language, just come to this site and hv a look.

Click HERE.

September 20, 2007

Hinava – another signature dish

Filed under: Food, Kadazan Dusun, Recipes — J Martin @ 11:45 pm


Just now I found this site while googling information about bosou.

For the full recipe, click here.

Let’s make bosou

Filed under: Food, Kadazan Dusun, Recipes — J Martin @ 10:49 pm

Bosou is a signature dish for Kadazan Dusun. Bosou-making is simple, yet need practices for a perfection. Typical ingredients are including raw freshwater fish, pangi (Malay – kepayang, Scientific name – Pangium edule), salt, steamed rice and some other optional ingredients such as jackfruits, young pineapple fruits, tuhau, etc.

The making of bosou is very simple. First, all the ingredients are mixed thoroughly. Salt is usually added in excess to prolong the shelf life of the bosou. If warm rice is to be used, the mixture is cooled to room temperature before storing. Storing of bosou usually takes in a tight-closed container.

The traditional container for the bosou is the bottle-shaped gourd which is sealed with some bees-wax. Other traditional container includes kakanan. But now the traditional containers are replaced with tupperwares, glass bottles etc. Storing of bosou usually takes about five to seven days before it is can be eaten. Due to it’s strong smell and compost-like nature, it is advised to tight-close the container to avoid flies to take ‘control’ of the bosou and also to avoid growth of fungi.

Bosou can be eaten raw or cooked. Cooking is usually done to get rid of the smell and to enhance the taste of the bosou. Some may add dried onions, chillies and other ingredients during the cooking.

It’s always a pleasure to have bosou as a side dish.

The fruit of pangi.


Let’s make bosou

Filed under: Food, Kadazan Dusun, Recipes — J Martin @ 10:49 pm

Bosou is a signature dish for Kadazan Dusun. Bosou-making is simple, yet need practices for a perfection. Typical ingredients are including raw freshwater fish, pangi (Malay – kepayang, Scientific name – Pangium edule), salt, steamed rice and some other optional ingredients such as jackfruits, young pineapple fruits, tuhau, etc.

The making of bosou is very simple. First, all the ingredients are mixed thoroughly. Salt is usually added in excess to prolong the shelf life of the bosou. If warm rice is to be used, the mixture is cooled to room temperature before storing. Storing of bosou usually takes in a tight-closed container.

The traditional container for the bosou is the bottle-shaped gourd which is sealed with some bees-wax. Other traditional container includes kakanan. But now the traditional containers are replaced with tupperwares, glass bottles etc. Storing of bosou usually takes about five to seven days before it is can be eaten. Due to it’s strong smell and compost-like nature, it is advised to tight-close the container to avoid flies to take ‘control’ of the bosou and also to avoid growth of fungi.

Bosou can be eaten raw or cooked. Cooking is usually done to get rid of the smell and to enhance the taste of the bosou. Some may add dried onions, chillies and other ingredients during the cooking.

It’s always a pleasure to have bosou as a side dish.

The fruit of pangi.


Let’s make bosou

Filed under: Food, Kadazan Dusun, Recipes — J Martin @ 10:49 pm

Bosou is a signature dish for Kadazan Dusun. Bosou-making is simple, yet need practices for a perfection. Typical ingredients are including raw freshwater fish, pangi (Malay – kepayang, Scientific name – Pangium edule), salt, steamed rice and some other optional ingredients such as jackfruits, young pineapple fruits, tuhau, etc.

The making of bosou is very simple. First, all the ingredients are mixed thoroughly. Salt is usually added in excess to prolong the shelf life of the bosou. If warm rice is to be used, the mixture is cooled to room temperature before storing. Storing of bosou usually takes in a tight-closed container.

The traditional container for the bosou is the bottle-shaped gourd which is sealed with some bees-wax. Other traditional container includes kakanan. But now the traditional containers are replaced with tupperwares, glass bottles etc. Storing of bosou usually takes about five to seven days before it is can be eaten. Due to it’s strong smell and compost-like nature, it is advised to tight-close the container to avoid flies to take ‘control’ of the bosou and also to avoid growth of fungi.

Bosou can be eaten raw or cooked. Cooking is usually done to get rid of the smell and to enhance the taste of the bosou. Some may add dried onions, chillies and other ingredients during the cooking.

It’s always a pleasure to have bosou as a side dish.

The fruit of pangi.


Let’s make bosou

Filed under: Food, Kadazan Dusun, Recipes — J Martin @ 10:49 pm

Bosou is a signature dish for Kadazan Dusun. Bosou-making is simple, yet need practices for a perfection. Typical ingredients are including raw freshwater fish, pangi (Malay – kepayang, Scientific name – Pangium edule), salt, steamed rice and some other optional ingredients such as jackfruits, young pineapple fruits, tuhau, etc.

The making of bosou is very simple. First, all the ingredients are mixed thoroughly. Salt is usually added in excess to prolong the shelf life of the bosou. If warm rice is to be used, the mixture is cooled to room temperature before storing. Storing of bosou usually takes in a tight-closed container.

The traditional container for the bosou is the bottle-shaped gourd which is sealed with some bees-wax. Other traditional container includes kakanan. But now the traditional containers are replaced with tupperwares, glass bottles etc. Storing of bosou usually takes about five to seven days before it is can be eaten. Due to it’s strong smell and compost-like nature, it is advised to tight-close the container to avoid flies to take ‘control’ of the bosou and also to avoid growth of fungi.

Bosou can be eaten raw or cooked. Cooking is usually done to get rid of the smell and to enhance the taste of the bosou. Some may add dried onions, chillies and other ingredients during the cooking.

It’s always a pleasure to have bosou as a side dish.

The fruit of pangi.


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